July 14, 2020         
Act Now to Secure 2020-2021 Private Tuition: Tutors International Receives High Volume of Requests as Parents Voice Concern Over   •   Massachusetts Governor announces financial support for Special Needs Schools   •   World Population Day 2020: DKT International Addresses Global Supply Chain Disruption, Shipping and Distribution Delays, Limited   •   Amesite Agrees to Provide its K-12 Remote Learning Platform through the Champlain Valley Educational Services Board of Cooperati   •   /C O R R E C T I O N -- Boys & Girls Clubs of America/   •   AJC Commends Governor Mike Parson for Signing Anti-BDS Bill into Law   •   Generational Equity Advises Sage Communications in Sale to Mod Op   •   Corporate Social Responsibility Related News Releases and Story Ideas for Reporters, Bloggers and Media Outlets   •   MillionaireMatch Releases Findings Showing Top Qualities and Traits Among Matches   •   Hair Cuttery Under New Ownership Safely Reopens 500 Salons   •   Female Founded Tequila Company, 21 SEEDS, Gains Traction as Celebrity Cocktail of Choice and Opens the Door for Women to Embrace   •   Become a Pet Trainer in the Newest Mabinogi “P.E.T.” Update Arriving on July 16   •   Genentech Provides Update on Phase III Study of Tecentriq in Women With Advanced-stage Ovarian Cancer   •   MidFirst Bank donates $1 million to local Boys & Girls Clubs to help create opportunities for youth facing adversities from   •   Horizon Bank and FHLB Dallas Provide $36K Grant to Assist Workers Impacted by the Pandemic   •   Classic Native American Ad Finds Relevance Today In Washington Redskins Decision To Change Name And Logo   •   Journalist Sabina Covo joins MegaTV   •   Goya Initiates Critical Distribution of Two Million Pounds of Food Across the United States and Puerto Rico   •   RTW Retailwinds, Inc. Voluntarily Files Chapter 11 Bankruptcy   •   TEGNA’s Justice Network to Relaunch as True Crime Network, Creating the First 24/7 True Crime Broadcast Network
Bookmark and Share

USC Study Finds Better Ways Of Treating Hispanics With Depression



A recent clinical trial finds that providing culturally sensitive care can have a marked effect on reducing depression among low-income, predominantly Hispanic diabetes patients. 

The study’s results are important, given that Hispanics in the United States have the highest lifetime risk for diabetes—with instances in females of 52.5 percent and 45.4 percent in males. Further, diabetes sufferers are at a two-fold higher risk of clinical depression than the general population.

The study is featured in the April 2010 issue of Diabetes Care, published by the American Diabetes Association. 

“We believe this trial got the attention of such a high-impact journal because this is such a disadvantaged and underserved population,” said principal investigator Kathleen Ell, the Ernest P. Larson Professor of Poverty, Ethnicity and Health at the University of Southern California School of Social Work. “They face a lot of barriers to receiving appropriate treatment—everything from language and cultural barriers to getting time off work.”

The research team—which included faculty from the University of Washington, the Keck School of Medicine of USC and the USC School of Pharmacy, as well as the medical director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services Clinical Resource Management program—recruited 387 diabetes patients suffering from depression to participate in the trial. The patients, recruited from two Los Angeles public safety-net clinics between August 2005 and July 2007, were randomized to either modestly enhanced usual care or collaborative stepped care and then followed over 18 months. 

The more successful depression-care model tested was attentive to socio-culturally driven patient treatment preferences, including psycho-education to dispel treatment misconceptions, reduce stigma and enhance therapeutic alliance. Bilingual social workers, with psychiatrist supervision, worked directly with primary care physicians, providing patients with problem-solving skill training to enhance diabetes and depression self-management and cope with socioeconomic stress, as well as patient navigation assistance to facilitate patient-doctor communication and to help them access needed financial and social resources. The model also featured relapse-prevention and behavioral activation to encourage treatment adherence over 12 months.

Almost all patients in the intervention group preferred psychotherapy instead of medication to treat their depression. If they did not respond to therapy alone, they became more open to antidepressant medication after building a relationship with the social worker, Ell says. Having a social worker to talk with also helped ensure patients adhered to their medication regimen. 

“Side effects are very common in antidepressants,” explains Ell. “But a patient may have no side effects by switching to a different medication. Guided by an evidence-based stepped care algorithm, we set it up so the social worker consulted the study psychiatrist via telephone and then communicated directly with the prescribing primary care physician if the medication needed to be adjusted.”

The above intervention program was compared with a model of modestly enhanced usual care, which included standard clinic care, along with patient receipt of depression educational pamphlets and a community resource list. The study found that the intervention patients had significantly greater depression and quality of life improvement over those who only received enhanced usual care.

The study concluded that providing collaborative, culturally sensitive acute and maintenance care that includes facilitating access to socioeconomic resources and is organizationally integrated within safety-net care systems is likely to have a noticeable effect on decreasing disparities in depression care among low-income Hispanic patients with diabetes. In response to the study, the Los Angeles County Department ofHealth Services already has hired social workers to provide such intervention on an ongoing basis. The study team is now conducting comparative cost analyses of the two care models.

About the USC School of Social Work
The University of Southern California’s School of Social Work ranks among the nation’s top 10 social work graduate programs and maintains the oldest social work master’s and PhD programs in the West. With its reputation for educational excellence, cultural diversity and research funding, the school prepares students for leadership roles in public and private organizations that serve individuals, families and communities in need. The USC School of Social Work was the first to endow a center for interdisciplinary social work research—the Hamovitch Center for Science in the Human Services—and remains a pioneer in translational research, experiential learning and academic innovation.


Contact:
 Cindy Monticue (213) 740-2021, monticue@usc.edu

or Eddie North-Hager at (213) 740-9335 or edwardnh@usc.edu 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News