Today's Date: March 2, 2024
Duncan's First Nation celebrates the opening of a new water treatment plant   •   Minister Qualtrough announces investments in sport and physical activity opportunities for Indigenous communities   •   Robust AI: Transforming Education and Healthcare with AI-Powered Teacher Apps   •   Standing Buffalo and Canada sign roadmap to advance reconciliation and rebuild their relationship   •   Canada is connecting more than 150 Northwest Territories households to high-speed Internet and bringing mobile connectivity to r   •   1,000 Dream Fund Kicks Off Women's History Month Celebration with Twitch Charity Fundraiser in Partnership with Twitch Women's U   •   Barnes & Noble Education Receives Continued Listing Standard Notice From NYSE   •   /C O R R E C T I O N -- Lexus/   •   EMPOWER Leads Foster Care Services for All Children and Families in the Metroplex East Region   •   WM Elects Tom Bené to Board of Directors   •   Meridiam Breaks Ground in Selma, Alabama, on Transformative Fiber Infrastructure Project   •   University of Phoenix Continues Nationwide Networking Series, "Small Bites, Big Connections," Fostering Alumni Community Bonds   •   AHF Opens Food Pantry for San Diego Veterans   •   Calvin Klein Fragrances announces Idris and Sabrina Elba as the face of new Calvin Klein ETERNITY AROMATIC ESSENCE fragrance cam   •   Mexico City's Night Sky Lights Up With Opening of Scientology Church for Del Valle   •   Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Launches Ninth Annual Make March Matter® Fundraising Campaign   •   Croptimistic Releases Inaugural Sustainability Report   •   The Family Initiative (TFI) Becomes One of the Largest Community-Based Care Child Welfare Agencies in the U.S.   •   Pittsburgh 12th Grader Selected to Join Million Girls Moonshot Flight Crew   •   Ventas to Participate in Investor Meetings at Citi 2024 Global Property CEO Conference
Bookmark and Share

Vitamin D Deficient Black Teens Risk Heart Disease

 CHEVY CHASE , MD -  — Vitamin D deficiency is associated with arterial stiffness, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, in black teens according to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). Black teens taking vitamin D supplementation of 2,000 international units (IU) per day had a decrease in central arterial stiffness.

“While we think of the sun as providing humans with most of our body’s requirement of vitamin D, 95 percent of the 44 black teenagers living in sunny Georgia who took part in this study were classified as vitamin D deficient,” said Yanbin Dong, MD, PhD, of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta and lead author of the study. “Our study shows that vitamin D supplementation may improve cardiovascular health in black teens who don’t get enough vitamin D from their diet and sun exposure.”

In this study, 44 black teenagers (male and female) were randomly assigned to receive either 400 IU of vitamin D per day as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics or 2,000 IU of vitamin D per day. Study subjects taking 400 IU of vitamin D per day did not achieve vitamin D sufficiency, while their peers who took 2,000 IU of vitamin D per day on average became vitamin D sufficient.

Researchers measured arterial stiffness in study subjects using pulse wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive procedure where a pulse is emitted at two arterial sites. The pulse’s transit time and distance travelled help researchers reliably calculate arterial stiffness. Results from the study showed that vitamin D may protect vascular systems and that sufficient supplementation of vitamin D could elicit favorable alterations in the arterial system and in cardiovascular function in general.

“Our study is the first clinical trial of vitamin D intervention to use 2,000 IU in black subjects and to include cardiovascular risk factors as outcomes in youth,” said Dong. “Our study indicates that the current recommendations for vitamin D intake in black teenagers may need to be revised upward.”

Other researchers working on the study include: Inger Stallmann-Jorgensen, Norman Pollock, Ryan Harris, Daniel Keeton, Ying Huang, Ke Li, Reda Bassali, Dehuang Guo, Jeffrey Thomas, Gary Pierce, Jennifer White and Haidong Zhu of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta; and Michael Holick of Boston University Medical Center in Mass.

The article, “A 16-week randomized clinical trial of 2,000 IU daily vitamin D3 supplementation in black youth: 25-hydroxyvitamin D, adiposity, and arterial stiffness,” will appear in the October 2010 issue of JCEM

 

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of over 14,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied, and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at www.endo-society.org.



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
Breaking News
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News