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Weak Reception For Women In IT World

FORT LAUDERDALE - Despite years of criticism on the subject, there are still large disparities in the way men and women view employment within the technology field, according to the 2010 Technisource Women in Information Technology Report. Most notably, differences in viewpoints were concentrated in compensation, mentors and role models, and challenges faced.

The new study demonstrates that while some lagging societal issues remain unchanged across the board, such as equal compensation, some perceived differences may be the result of specific choices and priorities between genders.

Among the key findings:

Career Satisfaction

  • Seventy-eight percent of women do not believe that compensation is equal between men and women – nearly half of the male respondents do perceive equality.
  • When asked about most important factors to men and women for career satisfaction, the greatest differences were men chose compensation and women chose being challenged and flexibility.

Career Progression

  • Fifty-two percent of women working in IT believe there is a "glass ceiling" that restricts their employment growth (28% of women are neutral).
  • When asked what the most important factors for career success were over the next five years, both men and women responded with technology experience and skills.

Mentorship/Role Models

  • When asked if respondents have had or do have a mentor, women responded the highest with 33 percent to 28 percent of men.
  • Seventy-three percent of women do not believe there are enough role models for women (versus 52 percent of men).

Future of Women in IT

  • Both men (56 percent) and women (70 percent) believe that greater promotion of IT as a career choice for women is the top encouraging factor for young women to enter the field.
  • Twenty-seven percent of men believe that women have an advantage over men working in the IT field.
  • Only 26 percent of men and 24 percent of women believe that society encourages young women to study math and science.
  • According to respondents, 74 percent of women believe female workers face a different set of career challenges than their male counterparts (compared to 48 percent of men).

"Our Women in Information Technology Report shows that there appear to be differences beyond how both women and men view their compensation and career progression within the IT field," said Alisia Genzler, vice president of the Northeast Region of Technisource. "Employers should take heed of these differing mindsets to better understand the unique priorities and challenges each of these groups face. Failing to do so will affect employee satisfaction, work performance, and in turn create a workforce that will jump at the opportunity to work for an employer that recognizes and acknowledges what really matters to them."

CLICK HERE  to view the Full Report


STORY TAGS: WOMEN, MINORITY, DISCRIMINATION, DIVERSITY, FEMALE, UNDERREPRESENTED, EQUALITY, GENDER BIAS, EQUALITY



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