Today's Date: February 8, 2023
Entrepreneur Harry Massey Launches Energy4Life – A Cutting-Edge, Biotech Company   •   HUDSON'S BAY CELEBRATES THE LAUNCH OF SHOP_BLK; FIFTEEN PERCENT PLEDGE'S AURORA JAMES DELIVERS KEYNOTE FOR PANEL DISCUSSION   •   Top Discoveries from a Record-Breaking Year for Cincinnati Children's   •   The Marco's Pizza® Foundation Teams Up with No Kid Hungry to Help Provide 2.5M Meals to Children   •   UnitedHealthcare Introduces New Rewards Program With a Modern Approach to Well-Being   •   Dr. Michael Taylor joins Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine as Director of the Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Re   •   Government of Canada selects organization to administer the Black-led Philanthropic Endowment Fund   •   After Alcohol Destroyed His Life, Veteran Says Confidential Recovery Saved Him   •   KLAS Research Awards CarePayment Top Patient Financing Company for 2023   •   40 Provider Multi-Disciplinary Practice Selects eClinicalWorks EHR and healow   •   Local readers vote two Sagora communities best in Carrollton   •   American Water Named One of America’s Top Corporations for Women’s Business Enterprises by Women’s Business En   •   Samsung Introduces Premium Women’s Health Ultrasound   •   Cydni Tetro, CEO of Brandless, Earns South Valley Chamber Titan Award   •   Fun on the Run: Basic Recreation Beyond Most Family Budgets, LISEP Research Shows   •   INVESTOR ALERT: Law Offices of Howard G. Smith Announces Investigation of Atlassian Corporation (TEAM) on Behalf of Investors   •   Dentsu and Urban One Partner on Season 3 of More Than That with Gia Peppers   •   Domain Timber Advisors Acquires Nearly 22,000 Acres of Southeast Timberland   •   Pro-Tech Group Receives Patent for Bi-Directional Loader for Handling Cargo   •   CHG Healthcare Announces Three New Promotions, Expanding Senior Leadership Team
Bookmark and Share

Will Minorities Be Left Out Of Health-Care Law Provision?

 

BALTIMORE, MD -  Hospitals and physician practices that form care-coordinating networks called “Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs),” under provisions of the new health-care law could reap cost-savings and other benefits. However, experts at Johns Hopkins and the University of Pennsylvania warn that such networks could potentially be designed to exclude minorities and widen disparities in health care.

 

In a commentary appearing in the April 27 issue of theJournal of the American Medical Association, a Johns Hopkins physician says that as a result of new provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, wealthy hospitals and practices may “cherry-pick” similar, wealthy institutions and groups to form ACOs, and avoid poor and minority-heavy patient populations treated elsewhere in order to lower costs and raise quality of care.

ACOs are designed to encourage patients to seek care within their own network, further accentuating the disparities between networks.

In practical terms, writes Craig Pollack, M.D., M.H.S., assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins, hospitals and physician practices that treat a disproportionate share of minorities may be unable to join ACOs and fall further behind in the cost and quality of care benefits likely to occur in such networks.

“There is ample evidence of racial and ethnic disparities in health care,” says Pollack. “Hospitals and private practices that care for greater numbers of minorities tend to have larger populations of Medicaid and uninsured patients. These patients have less access to specialists, and their hospitals and practices tend to have fewer institutional resources than their counterparts.”

“There is wide difference in the ability of hospitals and practices to implement the cost and quality measures needed to form ACOs,” adds Pollack, who cites financial resources, management structure, and size as barriers to forming such networks. Under the law, ACOs must be able to provide all levels of care for at least 5,000 Medicare beneficiaries.

Pollack says ACOs could improve coordination of care across private practices and hospitals by encouraging hospitals and doctors to work more closely together on inpatient and outpatient care. Cancer care, for example, could be enhanced with “patient navigators” who coordinate services, he says. He notes that the potential benefits of ACOs have yet to be monitored and evaluated by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare, and will be an important component to wider adoption of ACOs.

To monitor the impact of ACOs on health-care disparities, Pollack and his co-author, Katrina Armstrong, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania, suggest measures to evaluate the process of creating ACOs from an antitrust/market consolidation perspective. Measures of quality should include details of the patient population by race and ethnicity within individual ACOs; across separate ACOs; and compared with patients not in ACOs.


STORY TAGS: Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News, Hispanic News, Latino News, Mexican News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Latina, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News