Today's Date: June 19, 2024
The Lighthouse Church and Ministries to Host Cry Out Conference: A Transformative Experience of Healing and Empowerment   •   Louisiana Supreme Court Upholds State’s Grace Period Law for Filing of Child Sex Abuse Lawsuits   •   ErthCycle in Talks for Global Expansion with Major Middle Eastern Poultry Processor   •   Toshiba, Sojitz and CBMM Unveil an Ultra-Fast Charging Electric Bus Prototype Powered by Next-Generation Lithium-ion Batteries w   •   ATSG Recognizes Six Scholarship Recipients   •   ARMENIAN WOMEN'S WELFARE ASSOCIATION (AWWA) EXPANDS ITS IMPACT WITH NEW LEADERSHIP   •   Cipher Neutron Achieves Breakthrough Efficiency with its AEM Electrolyser Stack   •   Black Rifle Coffee Company Earns Ranking on Circana’s 2023 List of New Products Pacesetters   •   Certiport Names 2024 Microsoft Office Specialist US National Champions   •   Connie Chung Receives Asian Hall of Fame Centennial Medal   •   Celebrating Juneteenth: Mike Jette’s Commitment to Justice and Equality   •   The Rocky Mountain ADA Center to Exhibit During Denver and Thornton Colorado Pride Events in June 2024   •   Retirement Home Services Market size is set to grow by USD 4.36 billion from 2024-2028, rising life expectancy to boost the mark   •   New Sleepypod Crash Test Dummy Dogs Test the Efficacy of Car Safety Restraints   •   MULTI GRAMMY AWARD-WINNING ARTIST LIZZO KICKS OFF 5TH ANNUAL JUNETEENTH GIVEBACK FEATURING IMPACTFUL INITIATIVES AND INSPIRING C   •   Ohio STEM Innovation Summit Draws Record Attendance, Celebrates Leaders in Education   •   Cape Breton-Unama'ki Based Company Building Video Game Inspired by Mi'kmaw Legends   •   Ragsdale Ranch: A New Community that Blends Local Aesthetics with Modern Home Architecture   •   Shelley Niro: 500 Year Itch - The first retrospective exhibition of the multi-media work of Mohawk artist Shelley Niro   •   The Queen of Gay Street and Former Elite Daily Senior Writer to Sign Books at Lady Gaga's Family's Restaurant in Special Pride M
Bookmark and Share

Women Still Shortchanged At Work

 

Canton, GA - Women still make less than men in the same jobs, even at the top. The Institute for Women's Policy Research released a study that states that women still make only 77 percent of what men do.  

 

In fact, looking at how much women get paid in comparison to their male counterparts, women make approximately 77cents to the dollar. However, that wage gap does not factor in differences in education, experience, talent, tenure and industry -- all of which influence a worker's salary. 

Median earnings for women of color generally are even worse. In 2007, the average income for African-American women was 68.7 percent of men's earnings, and Latina income were 59 percent of men's. 

The wide gap is not just a women's concern. Identical pay for women raises total family earnings, which in turn will profit the entire family. Annually, American working families lose $200 billion and at this rate, the wage difference will be here for 50 or more years. 

Many researchers believe that feminine qualities may be the reason that women make less money. Males may be more proactive with salary negotiations or push harder for sales. 

There are several signs of progress though: the first bill Barack Obama signed into law as President was aimed at U.S. pay gap, and the Senate is deliberating over a bill that is intended at addressing underlying discrimination. 

###
Ratelines
Canton, GA
770-720-3395



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News